Musings of a Distractible Mind


Thoughts of an odd, but not harmful primary care physician.

Overcoming Shame

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Overcoming Shame

This insecurity is the biggest challenge in my practice: getting people to change their behavior.  Somehow I have to somehow get people to pay attention to their health when they'd rather ignore it, to be taking medications when they'd rather not, to be exercising when they don't want to, to lose weight when they love cheeseburgers, and to be checking their blood sugars when they'd rather not know how high they are.  After trying lots of things over the past 20+ years, the one thing I find almost never works is what is usually done: lecturing the patient.

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Entering The Narrative

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Entering The Narrative

My hope is that somehow we are able to return to care that is patient-centered. People want their narrative to be a good one, and doctors need to be able to enter that narrative and become a positive influence.  Our goal needs to push people out of the medical realm and back to living the rest of their narratives with as little contact with the healthcare system as possible.  That's what patient-centered care really is.

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Noncompliant Patient-Centeredness

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Noncompliant Patient-Centeredness

If you look up the word "compliance" in a thesaurus, the first synonym (at least in my thesaurus) is "obedience to."  This implies that non-compliant patients are, at least to some degree, equivalent to disobedient patients.  This is borne out by the reaction many patients seem to expect of me when they "confess" they haven't taken prescribed medications: they look guilty — like they are expecting to be scolded.

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Patient Centered Care

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Patient Centered Care

The real question I am asking here is not if this care is good or bad (the answer to that is, yes, it is good and bad), but whether it is patient-centered.  

This should be a silly question, like asking if car-repair is car-centered.  But it is clear that much of the high cost of care in our country is due to the huge number of unnecessary procedures, medications, hospitalizations, and services given to/done on people.  Unnecessary care is, almost always, not patient-centered.  

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Patient Centered Service

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Patient Centered Service

The vast majority of people truly want a doctor they respect and actually like.  This may come as a shock to many of my jaded colleagues who routinely face the ire of people stuck in waiting room purgatory, ignored or disbelieved by doctors, and treated as objects instead of people.  They think that people are angry because they don't like doctors.  They view the people on their schedule as, at best, the hungry masses they must placate and, at worst, as their adversaries they must conquer. Then they wonder why their patients are so unhappy?

The past three years has taught me otherwise.  People want to like their doctors.  We just haven't given them any reason to do so.

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Patient Centered (Part 1)

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Patient Centered (Part 1)

Rather than dwelling on the malfunction of the system, however, I want to turn my eyes toward what most people don't see: what real patient-centered care could and should be. It's not that I am suddenly wiser than my colleagues in the sick-care system.  Despite 18 years in practice, I was not able to see what true patient-centered care looked like until I left the system. 

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Of Drugs and Rectal Pain

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Of Drugs and Rectal Pain

Fortunately for this my patient, I was not only able to reunite him with the joys of sitting, but I was able, with a little research, to find him his proctological savior at a low cost.  Unfortunately, most patients don't have docs who are economically incentivized to save them money, and most people don't realize all of the games played by pharmaceutical companies and pharmacies to routinely perform wallet biopsies, nor do they know how to find the cheapest prices for their medications.

I don't know what can be done about this kind of thing aside from increasing awareness. I'm not real confident in any government solution.  People just need to be smarter shoppers when it comes to their care.  It's just a shame that people who are dealing with health problems (even if it is just trouble sitting) have to outsmart the gaming done by those supposedly trying to help them.

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Wisdom from a Toddler

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Wisdom from a Toddler

I could say the cliche' things about it seeming like yesterday, yet like it has been forever since I worked anywhere else.  I guess I just did…so there’s that.  But more to the point is the reality that I actually survived.  Many expressed confidence in me when I started doing this, while many others expressed supreme skepticism over whether or not this type of practice could actually work.  To both of those groups of people I say: keep waiting to make your final judgment.  The practice, while profitable and now growing steadily, is still not near to the point I need it to be.  It’s heading in that direction, but there are no guarantees; I still could mess this thing up.

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Sherpas Wanted

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Sherpas Wanted

 People are quick to accept non-answers from specialists, to be misconstrued by ER doctors, and to spend a week in the hospital without knowing what is going on.  Other doctors are far too willing to accept fragmented care, not knowing the context of the current hospitalization or outpatient consultation. 

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The High Cost of High Cost

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The High Cost of High Cost

Since my model of practice (a monthly fee without copay or other profitable procedures/products) benefits most from people paying for my service without heavy use of those services, this seemed to be prudent.  It seems that I was right about this, when comparing experiences with my colleague.  People are much less likely to pay $50 per month (or more) unless they have significant need, so a higher price essentially selects for more complex and/or demanding patients.  

This is why I can reasonably handle 640 patients today with only two nurses (one of whom is away on vacation).  Yes, I don't get as much money as I would for 640 patients at a higher monthly rate, but I wonder if I could actually handle that number of patients with only two nurses if I selected out for more demanding patients with that higher rate.    I doubt it.  The longer I consider this, the more I'm convinced of its truth, and the less I am inclined to raise my rates (much to the chagrin of my accountant).

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